Let’s take the guesswork out of this..

alone on a swing

This is a re-blog which was originally published in November of 2013.  Many of my readers found this helpful at the time.  If you are struggling with “the numbers” including the scale, this may help.

Here is something you may have heard about, but never used.

TRAINING HEART RATE

Training heart rate is something you may want to consider if your weight loss is stalling.  Getting the most from your workout, once you know your THR, helps with intensity.  Before I get into that, let’s debunk what THR is not.

HEART RATE MAX

Heart rate maximum is 220-age.  This number supposedly represents the highest rate your pulse should be while exercising.  The reason I say supposedly, is because it is still just a number.  I exceed mine regularly, before breaking a decent sweat.  Depending upon how aerobically fit you are,  it may need adjustment.  Heart rate max is a starting point; a way of deciphering your THR.

TRAINING INTENSITY AND THR

Figuring out your THR is pretty easy.  Start with 220-age.  This gives you your HEART RATE MAX.  This number is then subtracted from your RESTING HEART RATE.  Resting heart rate is just that; your pulse while doing nothing.  You may use your carotid (pulse on either side of your neck) or your radial (pulse found on thumb side of your wrist).  Use you index and middle finger to check your pulse; never your thumb.  Take your pulse for one full minute.

Your result from this subtraction is your HEART RATE RESERVE.  This number is now multiplied by desired training intensity.  Let’s say you want to work out at the high-end of “moderate intensity.”  This number is around 55%.  Your result is now multiplied by .55, then added to your resting heart rate.  This result is your THR.  Sound confusing?  Let’s clear that up.

Example–50-year-old female, who wants to work out at low-end of “high intensity.”  This intensity is represented by 60%.  Her resting pulse is 78.

220-50=170 (heart rate max)

170-78=92 (heart rate reserve)

92 x .60(training intensity)=55.2 (round to 55)

55 + 78(resting heart rate)=133

133 to 134 would be the THR (training heart rate) for which she would aim, if she wanted to work out at the low-end, of high intensity.

Let’s look at this same woman; however this is her “moderate intensity” day.  Low end of moderate intensity is 40%.  Her age is still 50; but her pulse today is 72.

We start with 170, because this is 220-her age(50).

170-72(resting heart rate)=98(heart rate reserve)

98 x .40(intensity)=39.2 (round to 39)

39 + 72=111

Her THR  for moderate intensity is 111-112.

This formula is known as the KAROVONEN Method.  It uses percentages (40-85%) of heart rate reserve, rather than just a heart rate max.  It also enables you to tailor your workout intensities, toward your target heart rate.  This might help you achieve your weight loss goals, by adjusting and varying your intensity.

In its entirety, the formula looks like this:

HRmax-HRrest=HRR(heart rate reserve)

[HRR x training%] + HRrest = THR(training heart rate)

If you have any underlying cardiac conditions, or just getting started, check with your medical professional before embarking on any exercise routine.

Need further help with THR, HR max and intensity?  Contact me @serrenity.c@gmail.com

Keep up and keep at it.

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