Are you eating because of what’s eating you?

eat it up  This was one of my more popular posts, originating last year.  However, I wanted to re-post it as a follow-up to “What’s in a number?”

You are what you eat.  Most of us have heard this reiterated since childhood.  We’ve probably put it to use ourselves, in an attempt to discourage “unhealthy” eating habits.

Why we eat, is just as important as what we eat. 

You are on your way home from work, which happens to be a 90 minute commute.  Today traffic is being rerouted, bypassing your exit.  Your little one should have been picked up 15 minutes ago, and the sitter wants to know “how much longer?”   Your eldest son has football practice, and is now contending with the sitter for you to pick up his call.  Your husband is also waiting to be heard, but his call gets dropped.  You finally make it off the expressway.  Your husband called back, and is on his way to the sitter.  Your son phones again–but this time it’s to tell you football practice is Thursday; today is Tuesday.  You actually get a unemcumbered trip home.

Even if this isn’t quite your life–you get the idea.

Now perhaps you have had a late lunch, even munched on that “healthy” snack while sitting in traffic.

Yet what will most of us do within the next 30 minutes?  Forty percent of us caught in this or similar scenarios, will stop at McDonald’s, Burger King, Brown’s Chicken, or whatever franchise is nearest and dearest.  A portion of this forty will order take out.  If you are not part of that percentage, there is a sixty percent chance once you arrive home, one of your initial actions will include opening the refrigerator; even if you don’t have to prepare a family meal.

Sound a little more familiar?

Women are usually portrayed as the poster children for emotional eating.  Starting in our teens (and often earlier), we develop a love-hate relationship with food.  Yet if we take a second look at the above scenario, this could have been Dad–caught in the same situation.  Who’s to say his actions wouldn’t include a trip to Burger King or Popeye’s?  Maybe, maybe not.

While our emotions may not be gender biased, perhaps our reaction to them, is.  Either way, taking a step aside as well as one back, is the best way to assess the situation.

While I am not an emotional eater, I fall into the category of emotional non-eater or faster.  If I am truly stressed, I can go for days without eating.  However once the circumstance is resolved, the “flood gates open.”  Also, if I find myself hungry before bedtime, I CANNOT go to bed that way.  There are few circumstances I find worse, than laying in bed hungry.

Before I find myself post-stress, I know I must prepare.  Easy access is key.  Keeping cereal bars low in fat & sugar, and other snacks in the house that will not translate into pounds on my body, are part of my preparation.  Once I feel able to eat a meal, the idea is I won’t want to drive to the nearest rib joint or fried chicken place (though these are always a temptation).

For me, assessment and planning are tantamount to staying on track.  Recognizing my triggers, then preparing for them before the deluge ensues, is part of my plan.

Many ideologies and theories exist on emotional eating.  None of them mean much, unless you realize what is happening, and find a suitable solution.  Hindsight may be 20/20.  Yet that hindsight comes with a cost.  It may mean the difference between the 20 lbs you gain, or 20 lbs you won’t have to lose.

All for now.  Keep up and keep at it.

Questions?  Comments?  Contact me at serrenity.c@gmail.com

 

 

 

Working out isn’t working…part one

eat it up  This post was orignially titled “Are you eating because of what’s eating you.”  I posted it 6/22/13.  However, I think this may be helpful if your workout is missing the mark.

You are what you eat.  Most of us have heard this reiterated since childhood.  We’ve probably put it to use ourselves, in an attempt to discourage “unhealthy” eating habits.

Why we eat, is just as important as what we eat. 

You are on your way home from work, which happens to be a 90 minute commute.  Today traffic is being rerouted, bypassing your exit.  Your little one should have been picked up 15 minutes ago, and the sitter wants to know “how much longer?”   Your eldest son has football practice, and is now contending with the sitter for you to pick up his call.  Your husband is also waiting to be heard, but his call gets dropped.  You finally make it off the expressway.  Your husband called back, and is on his way to the sitter.  Your son phones again–but this time it’s to tell you football practice is Thursday; today is Tuesday.  You actually get a unemcumbered trip home.

Even if this isn’t quite your life–you get the idea.

Now perhaps you have had a late lunch, even munched on that “healthy” snack while sitting in traffic.

Yet what will most of us do within the next 30 minutes?  Forty percent of us caught in this or similar scenarios, will stop at McDonald’s, Burger King, Brown’s Chicken, or whatever franchise is nearest and dearest.  A portion of this forty will order take out.  If you are not part of that percentage, there is a sixty percent chance once you arrive home, one of your initial actions will include opening the refrigerator; even if you don’t have to prepare a family meal.

Sound a little more familiar?

Women are usually portrayed as the poster children for emotional eating.  Starting in our teens (and often earlier), we develop a love-hate relationship with food.  Yet if we take a second look at the above scenario, this could have been Dad–caught in the same situation.  Who’s to say his actions wouldn’t include a trip to Burger King or Popeye’s?  Maybe, maybe not.

While our emotions may not be gender biased, perhaps our reaction to them, is.  Either way, taking a step aside as well as one back, is the best way to assess the situation.

While I am not an emotional eater, I fall into the category of emotional non-eater or faster.  If I am truly stressed, I can go for days without eating.  However once the circumstance is resolved, the “flood gates open.”  Also, if I find myself hungry before bedtime, I CANNOT go to bed that way.  There are few circumstances I find worse, than laying in bed hungry.

Before I find myself post-stress, I know I must prepare.  Easy access is key.  Keeping cereal bars low in fat & sugar, and other snacks in the house that will not translate into pounds on my body, are part of my preparation.  Once I feel able to eat a meal, the idea is I won’t want to drive to the nearest rib joint or fried chicken place (though these are always a temptation).

For me, assessment and planning are tantamount to staying on track.  Recognizing my triggers, then preparing for them before the deluge ensues, is part of my plan.

Many ideologies and theories exist on emotional eating.  None of them mean much, unless you realize what is happening, and find a suitable solution.  Hindsight may be 20/20.  Yet that hindsight comes with a cost.  It may mean the difference between the 20 lbs you gain, or 20 lbs you won’t have to lose.

All for now.  Keep up and keep at it.

Questions?  Comments?  Contact me at serrenity.c@gmail.com

Do I really need to be gluten free?

mecca & meadowGluten–another term we need to add to the “bad word” food vocabulary?  Let’s see–there’s sugar, in ever-increasing circles dairy, and now gluten.

Last post, I wanted to dispel the myths behind the big “O.” Organic only foodies have made the rest of us feel not only lacking in education, but find it necessary on some sites, to discuss the girth of our stomachs and backsides.  Of course, its only done in the name of non-organic heathens (such as myself) seeing the error of our ways, and improving our health.  Indeed.

For me, the jury is still out on this one–and maybe on an extended holiday.

Once again, like that proverbial dose of castor oil without the spoonful of sugar, I’m here to help.  At the very least, share another point of view.

http://www.womenshealthmag.com Is Gluten Bad for You?  Also, http://everydayhealth.com What the Heck are You Eating?

Both articles give solid information about gluten, who should be gluten-free, and if gluten-free living is really worth the hype.

Briefly, gluten is a protein found in barley, wheat, and rye.  While those diagnosed with celiac disease or gluten sensitivity have cause for concern, the rest of us need not buy into its defamation.  You may also be surprised that food labeled “gluten-free,” may pack more calories.  Why?  Gluten adds not only texture, but in many cases, taste.  In order to keep your taste buds happy, a substitute must be found–probably in the form of some type of fat.

In our quest for healthier lifestyles, it is easy to pitfall.  Before you do, and especially before you lighten your wallet in the name of that quest, ask yourself:  Does this change make sense in my life?  Does it address my specific needs?  If you are trying to lose weight, will this change help or hinder you?  How?  Lastly, how attainable & sustainable is this change–especially once you’ve met your goals?

Theories come and go–decade by decade, year by year, often hour by hour.  Avail yourself of the prevailing knowledge; but understand this:  Its only relevance is how relevant it is to you.

All for now.  Keep up and keep at it.

Questions? Comments? Contact me at serrenity.c@gmail.com

Judging me judging you…

healthy living waterfall No one is immune–we all have the occasional bout (some more frequent than others) of Comparitis.  We may even suffer from the none too evasive symptoms which complement it–Superior Fit-zures.  Not too worry–the signs and symptoms are blatant; and the disease very treatable.  Like a strong dose of castor oil without the teaspoon of sugar, I am here to help those plagued by this highly communicable disease.

The websites I use for information for my blog meet with scrutiny.  The information must be timely, reliable, and understandable to those outside of the medical profession.  Few meet with all three criteria.  Though I shouldn’t be surprised, I found myself taken aback by commentary under an article from a site I frequent.

The article itself was well-written and expressed thought-provoking ideas.  Some commenting–not so much.

Most extolled the virtues of organically grown fruit and vegetables.  Nothing wrong with that.  However, one went on to elaborate about the girth of backsides of those shopping at discount food chains.  Another chimed in about how she bought a mango for a child begging for one, only to have the mother throw it to the ground.  While I appreciate her sentiments, I can also understand how that mother must have felt.

Few of us who are mothers or fathers, would deny our children food.  Whether you are a married or single parent, if you are feeding more than three mouths excluding yourself, discount food chains may not be an option.  They are probably a staple.  Organically grown produce is a luxury.  One in which my family does not partake.

Yes–I am one of those discount food chain shoppers.  But more to the point–does my backside meet the commentator’s criteria?  Last time I bought workout capris and yoga pants (1 week ago) one was a size small, the other an x-small.  However, I forgot to mention his comment about the fat children in tow.  Well–here we go.  My son is 5′ 8″ and weighs a whopping 130 pounds.

The mango issue not withstanding, though I do understand the mother, who are we to judge?  Does this Comparitis empower you?  Or are you afraid that might be you one day–shopping a food chain with barely enough for TV dinners?

If you live in a community where obesity and fresh food is an issue–do something instead of judging someone.  If you are a trainer–volunteer some hours.  It’s how I started as a trainer; and still do.  Gave me great experience, and built my confidence transitioning to a new profession.  Even if you feel you don’t possess this expertise, mentor a child.  Teach him/her about nutrition.  My mom’s favorite saying was “give a child a fish, he’ll eat for a day.  Teach him how to fish, he’ll eat for a lifetime.”  If the child/and or family understands the importance of diet and exercise, your efforts will not be in vain–and more to the point; your mango will not end up on the floor.

All for now.  Keep up and keep at it.

Need my tips for shopping on a budget, but buying healthy?  Contact me at serrenity.c@gmail.com

Are you eating because of what’s eating you?

eat it upYou are what you eat.  Most of us have heard this reiterated since childhood.  We’ve probably put it to use ourselves, in an attempt to discourage “unhealthy” eating habits.

Why we eat, is just as important as what we eat. 

You are on your way home from work, which happens to be a 90 minute commute.  Today traffic is being rerouted, bypassing your exit.  Your little one should have been picked up 15 minutes ago, and the sitter wants to know “how much longer?”   Your eldest son has football practice, and is now contending with the sitter for you to pick up his call.  Your husband is also waiting to be heard, but his call gets dropped.  You finally make it off the expressway.  Your husband called back, and is on his way to the sitter.  Your son phones again–but this time it’s to tell you football practice is Thursday; today is Tuesday.  You actually get a unemcumbered trip home.

Even if this isn’t quite your life–you get the idea.

Now perhaps you have had a late lunch, even munched on that “healthy” snack while sitting in traffic.

Yet what will most of us do within the next 30 minutes?  Forty percent of us caught in this or similar scenarios, will stop at McDonald’s, Burger King, Brown’s Chicken, or whatever franchise is nearest and dearest.  A portion of this forty will order take out.  If you are not part of that percentage, there is a sixty percent chance once you arrive home, one of your initial actions will include opening the refrigerator; even if you don’t have to prepare a family meal.

Sound a little more familiar?

Women are usually portrayed as the poster children for emotional eating.  Starting in our teens (and often earlier), we develop a love-hate relationship with food.  Yet if we take a second look at the above scenario, this could have been Dad–caught in the same situation.  Who’s to say his actions wouldn’t include a trip to Burger King or Popeye’s?  Maybe, maybe not.

While our emotions may not be gender biased, perhaps our reaction to them, is.  Either way, taking a step aside as well as one back, is the best way to assess the situation.

While I am not an emotional eater, I fall into the category of emotional non-eater or faster.  If I am truly stressed, I can go for days without eating.  However once the circumstance is resolved, the “flood gates open.”  Also, if I find myself hungry before bedtime, I CANNOT go to bed that way.  There are few circumstances I find worse, than laying in bed hungry.

Before I find myself post-stress, I know I must prepare.  Easy access is key.  Keeping cereal bars low in fat & sugar, and other snacks in the house that will not translate into pounds on my body, are part of my preparation.  Once I feel able to eat a meal, the idea is I won’t want to drive to the nearest rib joint or fried chicken place (though these are always a temptation).

For me, assessment and planning are tantamount to staying on track.  Recognizing my triggers, then preparing for them before the deluge ensues, is part of my plan.

Many ideologies and theories exist on emotional eating.  None of them mean much, unless you realize what is happening, and find a suitable solution.  Hindsight may be 20/20.  Yet that hindsight comes with a cost.  It may mean the difference between the 20 lbs you gain, or 20 lbs you won’t have to lose.

All for now.  Keep up and keep at it.

Questions?  Comments?  Contact me at serrenity.c@gmail.com